Keynote Speakers

The congress is committed to providing an inclusive platform for all presenters with a focus on gender parity. The full program will reflect the diversity that exists in our field of study and work.

 

  • Professor Henrique Barros

    Professor of Epidemiology, University of Porto

  • Dr Rhian Daniel

    Reader in Medical Statistics, Cardiff University

  • Ms. Abigail Echo-Hawk

    Director, Urban Indian Health Institute

  • Professor Deborah Lawlor

    Professor of Epidemiology, University of Bristol

  • Professor Richard Martin

    Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Bristol

  • Professor K. Srinath Reddy

    President, Public Health Foundation of India

  • Professor Diana Sarfati

    National Director, Te Aho o Te Kahu, Cancer Control Agency in New Zealand

  • Professor Tyler VanderWeele

    Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health | Director, Harvard University

Professor Henrique Barros

Professor of Epidemiology, University of Porto

Henrique was born in Porto, Portugal. In 1991 became Gastroenterology specialist and defended his PhD, with research on the epidemiology of viral hepatitis.

Full Professor of Epidemiology at Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto;
President of the Institute of Public Health, University of Porto;
President of the National Health Council;
President of the IEA;

Responsible for designing and implementing three on-going Portuguese population-based cohorts which follow adults (EPiPorto), adolescents (EPITeen) and new-borns (G21); these research structures made possible to train a large number of Master and PhD candidates and resulted in multiple publications covering such topics as obesity, cardiovascular diseases, violence and social aspects of ageing besides a continued attention to methodological challenges and a special interest in perinatal epidemiology.

Dr Rhian Daniel

Reader in Medical Statistics, Cardiff University

Having studied mathematics at Cambridge University, Rhian completed an MSc in Medical Statistics and a PhD in missing data methods at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has since focused on methods for learning about cause-effect relationships from observational data, first as a post-doc and lecturer at LSHTM, and since 2017 as Reader in Medical Statistics at Cardiff University.

She is interested in situations, such as when disentangling path-specific causal effects, where standard regression is valid only under very restrictive assumptions, and thus modern concepts and methods from the causal inference school are especially useful.

Her current work on high-dimensional mediation is funded by a Sir Henry Dale fellowship from the Welcome Trust and the Royal Society.

Ms. Abigail Echo-Hawk

Director, Urban Indian Health Institute

Abigail Echo-Hawk is an enrolled member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. She is currently the Executive Vice President at Seattle Indian Health Board and the Director of Urban Indian Health Institute.
Currently, Abigail is part of multiple committees, Boards, and workgroups including the Best Starts for Kids Board, the March of Dimes Health Equity Workgroup, the Tribal Collaboration Working Group with the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Advisory Committee for Health Equity Research at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the NIDA American Indian and Alaska Native Collaborative Research Engagement Workgroup, and the Board of Data for Indigenous Justice.
In the past, Abigail spent eight years as the Tribal Liaison with Partnerships for Native Health at the School of Public Health at The University of Washington. In 2016, she became the Co-director of Partnerships of Native Health at the Washington State University Institute for Research and Education to Advance Community Health. Abigail was also the Tribal Relationship Facilitator at the Institute of Translational Health Sciences at the University of Washington from 2010 to 2015. In 2015, she became a Board Member for the Center for Indigenous Law and Justice.
Abigail has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies and a Master of Arts degree in Policy Studies, both from the University of Washington. She is an expert in American Indian and Alaska Native health, including strengths and resiliencies as well as deficits and disparities.

Professor Deborah Lawlor

Professor of Epidemiology, University of Bristol

Deborah Lawlor was Born in Bradford, in the North of England, and studied Medicine at Bristol University before working as a doctor in Bradford and Mozambique. She moved back to Bristol in 2000 to study for a PhD. She is now a Professor of Epidemiology in the Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol. Her research is concerned with developing and applying novel causal methods so that we can better understand the causes of adverse reproductive, perinatal and cardio-metabolic health, and the links between those conditions.

Professor Richard Martin

Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Bristol

I am professor of clinical epidemiology at the University of Bristol, UK. I lead a research programme investigating cancer aetiology, early-detection and prognosis. My work exploits the application of causal analysis methods in cancer epidemiology. I established CRUK’s Integrative Cancer Epidemiology Programme (ICEP) at Bristol University. ICEP combines cutting-edge genomic technologies, novel systematic review methods and large-scale bioinformatic platforms to robustly identify novel cancer risk-factors, molecular mechanisms and predictive biomarkers.

Professor K. Srinath Reddy

President, Public Health Foundation of India

Prof. K. Srinath Reddy is President, Public Health Foundation of India and is a cardiologist and epidemiologist. He has served as Visiting/Adjunct Professor at Harvard and Emory Universities. He has served on many WHO expert panels & was the President of the World Heart Federation. He chaired the High Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage for the Planning Commission of India and co-chairs the Thematic Group on Health for the Sustainable Solutions Development Network. He has published more than 500 scientific papers. His several honours include WHO Director General’s Award and Luther Terry Medal of American Cancer Society for outstanding contributions to global tobacco control and the Queen Elizabeth Medal for health promotion. He has received honorary doctorates from the University of London, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Lausanne, NTR Health Services, ILBS University.

Professor Diana Sarfati

National Director, Te Aho o Te Kahu, Cancer Control Agency in New Zealand

Professor Diana Sarfati (MBChB, MPH, PhD, FNZCPHM) is a public health physician, cancer epidemiologist and health services researcher. She is currently the Interim National Director of Cancer Control. She is also Director of the Cancer and Chronic Conditions (C3) Research Group at University of Otago, Wellington. Prof Sarfati is currently a member of the New Zealand National Cancer Leadership Board (NZ), as well as a member of the Advisory Committee to International Agency for Research on Cancer’s (IARC) Pacific cancer hub, the Academic Advisory Committee to IARC on the International Cancer Benchmarking ntly led the Lancet Oncology series on cancer control in small island developing states, published in August 2019.

Professor Tyler VanderWeele

Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health | Director, Harvard University

Tyler J. VanderWeele, Ph.D., is the John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Director of the Human Flourishing Program at Harvard University. He holds degrees from the University of Oxford, University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard University in mathematics, philosophy, theology, finance and applied economics, and biostatistics. His research concerns methodology for distinguishing between association and causation in observational studies, and the use of statistical and counterfactual ideas to formalize and advance epidemiologic theory and methods. His empirical research spans psychiatric, perinatal, and social epidemiology; the science of happiness and flourishing; and the study of religion and health. He is the recipient of the 2017 COPSS Presidents’ Award, has published over three hundred papers in peer-reviewed journals, and is author of the book Explanation in Causal Inference, published by Oxford University Press.